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Thank you for visiting the Cereals Market Update article library



Please use the search function below to browse articles from past issues of the Cereals Market Update, including updates about new products, resistance management and other agronomic issues.
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9/2/2011 12:00:00 AM
With the multiple challenges growers face - some of which include weed resistance, new disease races and damaging insects - it's important to continue to remind them of available management options, as well as new technologies that can help improve their operations. In each issue of the Cereals Market Update, Syngenta will track and tackle your biggest "Pest Pet Peeve." In this issue, the featured pest is the aphid.

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9/2/2011 12:00:00 AM
"Root health" is a term that plant pathologists have used for many years to describe a plant root that has very little disease. Most of the time these studies have focused on specific diseases, such as Pythium or Fusarium root rot. But, in the field there is always a combination of diseases, and they are affected by the environment. There have been numerous rating systems, but it has been difficult to correlate root ratings to yield. Environment makes a major impact on which diseases are limiting yield. For example, in cool, wet soils, Pythium may be the major problem, while in dry, sandy soils, other pathogens are most important.

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9/2/2011 12:00:00 AM
Above ground, bare patches are scattered through the field. Underground, roots have brown lesions or are shortened with darkened tips. Capable of causing 20 to 40 percent yield loss, this antagonist is called Rhizoctonia and is a common soil disease in cereal fields around the world, throughout the United States and particularly in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). As you meet with growers this fall, remind them of root diseases like Rhizoctonia that lurk below the surface and help to provide viable solutions to control the pathogens in time.

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9/2/2011 12:00:00 AM
It seemed as though Mother Nature had a cruel sense of humor this year. Some growers felt as though she never turned off the water faucet; whereas others were left to scratch the parched soils in wonder. Despite these challenging conditions, you can guide your growers to help their crops maximize water and nutrient uptake when faced with dry spells, beginning with the seedling. Protecting the Root System When a young seedling is developing, it's important to take steps to protect the delicate root system from damaging diseases and insects. Overall healthier root systems can then develop, and the crop can establish a stronger stand because the root tips can more efficiently take up water and nutrients. "Roots are water-absorbers for plants, so increasing root mass, area and number of root tips subsequently increases the moisture uptake of the plant, which thereby increases the health of the plant," explains Wayne Pedersen, Ph.D., emeritus plant pathologist at the University of Illinois.

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4/5/2011 12:00:00 AM
More and more research is pointing to ROOTS as holding the key to future crop productivity advancements. In fact, Nature recently published an article focusing on how plant breeders are looking at roots to unearth secrets to higher yield with minimal environmental impact.

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4/5/2011 12:00:00 AM
Snowfall accumulations this past winter approached six feet. The preceding cool and wet conditions may be presenting additional field preparation challenges for growers, including residue management; proper fertilizer application and placement; maintaining proper planting depth; suitably preparing soils; and finally, timely management of weeds, insects and diseases. With the strong commodity prices, the potential for a good return on investment in wheat exists.

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4/5/2011 12:00:00 AM
With developing resistance, new disease races and the spread of damaging insects, retailers and growers alike must be increasingly aware of harmful pests and how to prevent or treat them. In each issue, Syngenta will track and tackle your biggest "Pest Pet Peeve." In this issue, the featured pest is Italian ryegrass.

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4/5/2011 12:00:00 AM
When input costs such as fuel and fertilizer threaten the profitability of a grower, one is easily tempted to cut back on these inputs wherever possible. It is when input costs are at their highest that it is most important to ensure maximum yield and quality by protecting valuable crop investments from potential losses due to weeds and disease. Extracting the most from growers' valuable investments in seed, fertilizer, equipment and irrigation - to name a few - requires the use of effective and efficient crop protection programs.

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4/4/2011 12:00:00 AM
When dealing with potential threats to quality and yield potential, it's always better to be proactive than reactive. As retailers, you are constantly at work to ensure your growers are prepared and equipped with the solutions and tools they need to combat threats posed by insects, weeds and diseases.

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4/4/2011 12:00:00 AM
Weed resistance in cereals is a growing problem. Commonly used ALS and ACCase inhibitors, synthetic auxins and other modes of action are becoming less effective against weeds like Italian ryegrass, wild oat, green foxtail, Redroot pigweed and kochia. That means fewer effective herbicide options are available to wheat and barley growers.

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